Average Baby Height and Weight Chart (0 to 12 months)

baby height and weight chart

Looking for a guideline to help you track your baby’s growth? Check out our average baby height and weight chart. This chart provides averages based on babies aged 0 to 12 months, so it can be a helpful tool as your little one grows. Keep in mind that every baby is different, so if your child falls outside of the ranges provided here, don’t worry! Just consult with your pediatrician to get their expert opinion!!

The child growth chart 0 to 12 months is the most essential one. This chart is a basic tool that helps you to determine how your baby is growing. The growth chart also tells about the average height and weight of a baby in the first year of life. According to the world health organization, the average height of a full-term baby at birth is 40 to 50 cm, and the average weight of a full-term baby at birth is 3.2 to 3.3 kg. A growth chart helps in checking whether the baby is growing at the expected rate. If not, then it can be a sign of some underlying medical condition.

Though the child’s growth is affected by many factors like nutrition, genetics, and environment, the average height and weight of a baby at birth are generally proportional to the parents’ height and weight. Generally, the growth chart for babies is typically elaborate and has a lot of curves and lines. However, the basic month’s growth chart is quite simple and easy to understand. In this blog, we will explain to you the growth chart for both boys and girls.

What are baby growth charts?

Baby growth charts are used to track a baby’s weight and height over time. They are based on data from the World Health Organization (WHO) and are designed to be used by doctors, nurses, and other health care providers. The WHO growth charts are the most commonly used growth charts in the United States. However, there are other growth charts that are used in other countries.

Baby growth charts tell us how much a baby should weigh and how tall a baby should be at different ages. Growth charts can also give us information about a baby’s head circumference and length. The following are the growth standards for babies under the age of 24 months:

Head circumference: This is the distance around the head’s largest section, which indicates how your baby’s brain is developing.

Weight-for-age: This measures how much your baby weighs compared to other babies of the same age.

Length-for-age: This measures how long your baby is compared to other babies of the same age.

Weight-for-length: This measures how much your baby weighs compared to other babies who are the same length.

The following are the percentiles for babies under the age of 24 months:

Weight-for-age: 5th percentile, 10th percentile, 25th percentile, 50th percentile, 75th percentile, 90th percentile, 95th percentile.

Length-for-age: 5th percentile, 10th percentile, 25th percentile, 50th percentile, 75th percentile, 90th percentile, 95th percentile.

Head circumference-for-age: 5th percentile, 10th percentile, 25th percentile, 50th percentile, 75th percentile, 90th percentile, 95th percentile.

Weight-for-length: 5th percentile, 10th percentile, 25th percentile, 50th percentile, 75th percentile, 90th percentile, 95th percentile.

Note: (What do the percentiles mean? The percentiles tell us how your baby compares to other babies of the same age. For example, if your baby is in the 50th percentile for weight-for-age, that means that your baby weighs as much as or more than 50% of other babies of the same age and gender. If your baby is in the 90th percentile for length-for-age, that means that your baby is longer than or equal to 90% of other babies of the same age and gender.)

What’s the Average Baby Girl Height And Weight?

Additionally, the average height and weight of a baby girl is generally slightly shorter than that of a baby boy. In comparison to a baby boy, baby girls gain weight more slowly in their first year. From birth, the baby girl weight should be 3.2 kg and the height 45.6-52.7 cm. Generally, formula-fed babies (girls) height, weight, and head circumference will be greater than that of breastfed babies. It is medically reviewed by WHO, that if mothers have good nutrition, then their babies will have good growth. The rate of growth in length and weight generally slows down after the age of six months as the baby starts to become more active and begins to explore his or her surroundings more. The following table indicates the average height and weight of baby girls from birth to 12 months old:

Weight and height chart of Baby girl:

Age (In Months) Weight  

Height(IN CM)

Head Circumference (In cm)
(In KG’S) (In Pounds)
0 3.2 kg 7 lb 2 oz 45.6-52.7 31.7-36.1
1-month 4.5 kg 9 lb 14 oz 50.0-57.4 34.3-38.8
2-months 5.1 kg 11 lb 5 oz 53.2-60.9 36.0-40.5
3-months 5.8 kg 12 lb 14 oz 55.8-63.8 37.2-41.9
4-months 6.4 kg 14 lb 3 oz 58.0-66.2 38.2-43.0
5-months 6.9 kg 15 lb 3 oz 59.9-68.2 39.0-43.9
6-months 7.3 kg 16 lb 1 oz 61.5-70.0 39.7-44.6
7-months 7.6 kg 16 lb 14 oz 62.9-71.6 40.4-45.3
8-months 7.9 kg 17 lb 8 oz 64.3-73.2 40.9-45.9
9-months 8.2 kg 18 lb 2 oz 65.6-74.7 41.3-46.3
10-months 8.5 kg 18 lb 11 oz 66.8-76.1 41.7-46.8
11-months 8.7 kg 19 lb 4 oz 68.0-77.5 42.0-47.1
12-months 8.9 kg 19 lb 12 oz 69.2-78.9 42.3-47.5

What’s the Average Baby Boy Height And Weight?

A baby’s growth is an important factor in his or her overall health. To make sure your baby is growing properly, your healthcare provider will measure your baby’s length and weight at every well-child visit. The average height for a baby boy at birth should be 46.3-53.4 and the average weight should be 7 lb 6 oz. However, if your child’s weight and height are consistently lower or higher than the average, talk with your child’s doctor to ensure that your baby is developing as expected. The following chart lists the averages for weight and height of boys from birth to 12 months old:

Weight and height chart of Baby boy:

Age (In Months) Weight  

Height (In cm)

Head Circumference (In cm)
(In KG’S) (In Pounds)
0 3.3 kg 7 lb 6 oz 46.3-53.4 32.1-36.9
1-month 4.5 kg 9 lb 14 oz 51.1-58.4 35.1-39.5
2-months 5.6 kg 12 lb 4 oz 54.7-62.2 36.9-41.3
3-months 6.4 kg 14 lb 1 oz 57.6-65.3 38.3-42.7
4-months 7.0 kg 15 lb 7 oz 60.0-67.8 39.4-43.9
5-months 7.5 kg 16 lb 9 oz 61.9-69.9 40.3-44.8
6-months 7.9 kg 17 lb 8 oz 63.6-71.6 41.0-45.6
7-months 8.3 kg 18 lb 5 oz 65.1-73.2 41.7-46.3
8-months 8.6 kg 18 lb 15 oz 66.5-74.7 42.2-46.9
9-months 8.9 kg 19 lb 10 oz 67.7-76.2 42.6-47.4
10-months 9.2 kg 20 lb 3 oz 69.0-77.6 43.0-47.8
11-months 9.4 kg 20 lb 12 oz 70.2-78.9 43.4-48.2
12-months 9.6 kg 21 lb 4 oz 71.3-80.2 43.6-48.5

What happens if your child is below and above the margins?

Most babies are born within a fairly healthy weight range. However, some babies may be born underweight or overweight. If your baby is below the 5th percentile on the BMI-for-age chart, they may be considered underweight. If they’re above the 95th percentile, they may be considered overweight.

While it’s important to be aware of these percentile ranges, it’s also important to remember that every child is different. Some children may be larger or smaller than others, and that’s perfectly normal.

If your child is below the 5th percentile on the BMI-for-age chart, their doctor may want to monitor their growth more closely. This is because being underweight can sometimes be a sign of an underlying health condition.

On the other hand, if your child is above the 95th percentile on the BMI-for-age chart, their doctor may want to evaluate their diet and activity level. This is because being overweight can increase a child’s risk of developing obesity and other health conditions later in life.

Also, keep in mind that the BMI-for-age chart is just one tool that doctors use to assess a child’s growth. Doctors will also take into account a child’s height, weight, and head circumference. They may also consider other factors, such as a family history of obesity or health conditions. If you’re concerned about your child’s weight, talk to their doctor. They can tell you whether your child is growing at a healthy rate and offer advice on how to help them reach a healthy weight.

How much weight should a baby gain each month?

Babies typically gain between 1/2 and 1 inch (about 1.5 to 2.5 centimeters) a month and gain 5 to 7 ounces (about 140 to 200 grams) per week during their first year. Those are just averages, though, so don’t be concerned if your baby’s growth seems to be on the slower or faster side. Some babies double their birth weight by 5 months and triple it by 12 months old. However, boys usually weigh more than girls, even when they’re babies.

During the first few months of life, most babies grow at a fairly consistent pace. After about 4 months, though, growth rates tend to slow down a bit. By the time they’re 6 months old, many babies will have reached in the 50th percentile for weight (meaning that out of 100 babies, 50 will be larger and 50 smaller). After 6 months, though, they might start to grow more quickly or slowly than average.

However, don’t get too caught up in the numbers. babies come in all shapes and sizes, and as long as your baby is growing at a healthy rate, he or she is probably just fine.

How quickly do babies grow in length?

Babies grow quickly in length during the first year of life. By age one, they will have grown an average of about two inches.

This growth occurs as a result of the baby’s cells dividing and growing. During the early weeks and months of life, babies grow mainly in length. After about six months, babies also start to grow in width (or thickness). This continued growth allows babies to increase their weight.

What is the normal weight and height for a Baby?

There really isn’t a “normal” weight or height for babies, since every child is different. However, they typically fall within a certain range. Most babies are between 19 and 21 inches long, and usually weigh between 6 and 9 pounds at birth. Again, though, keep in mind that every baby is different and will grow at its own pace. So don’t worry if your little one doesn’t fit perfectly into these averages. Just as long as they’re happy and healthy, that’s all that matters!

Do breastfed babies gain weight slower?

There is some evidence to suggest that breastfed babies may gain weight more slowly than their formula-fed counterparts. One study found that exclusively breastfed infants gained weight more slowly in the first 3 months than those who were fed a mix of breast milk and formula. However, by 6 months old, there was no significant difference in weight gain between the two groups.

It’s thought that the different compositions of breast milk may contribute to slower weight gain in breastfed babies. Breast milk is lower in fat and proteins than formula, which could result in slower growth. Additionally, breastfeeding requires more energy for babies to digest, which means they may not be getting as many calories from breast milk as they would from the formula.

The Bottom Line

So, what can you expect when it comes to your baby’s height and weight? Check out our average baby height and weight chart above for a general idea of what is typical during the first year. Note that your baby’s actual weight and length may vary slightly from the chart, depending on a number of factors (including whether you’ve had twins or other multiples). Keep in mind that all babies are different and will grow at their own pace, so if your little one falls outside of these ranges don’t worry. You can talk with your pediatricians about your baby’s growth and development if you have any concerns. We hope this average baby height and weight chart will give you a better idea of what to expect as your little one grows. If you have any queries about the above context then feel free to contact us.

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