Baby feeding schedule and food chart for the 1st year: How to Properly Feed your Baby

Are you a first-time mom and looking for a baby feeding schedule and food chart for the 1st year? Every baby is different and will have different feeding needs. However, there are some general guidelines that can help you create a healthy and nutritious feeding schedule for your little one. In this blog post, we will provide you with all the information you need to know about proper baby feeding. So, keep reading to learn more!

mother feeding her baby, toddler sitting in high chair at kitchen

Feeding babies is the most difficult aspect of parenting and it is important to feed them properly so that they can get all the nutrients they need. But it is also difficult because they have such tiny stomachs and they need to be fed often. Before your baby turns 1-year-old, he or she will need about 700 to 800 calories per day. This is why it’s important to have a baby feeding schedule and food chart handy so you can make sure your little one is getting enough to eat.

In the contrast, a baby food chart is a great tool for parents to use as a guide for what and how much to feed their baby. It also takes the guesswork out of portion sizes. With a proper day-to-night baby feeding schedule, you can ensure that your baby is getting enough food and nutrients throughout the day. As your baby grows he or she will need more food and you can slowly start to adjust the schedule and portions accordingly. Below we’ve outlined the general baby feeding schedule and food chart for the 12-month-year-old.

What is a baby’s feeding schedule?

A baby’s feeding schedule will vary depending on the baby’s age, weight, and appetite. Generally speaking, newborns will nurse every two to three hours, while formula-fed babies may eat every four hours. As the baby gets older, it will start to eat more frequently and will gradually develop a more predictable feeding schedule.

For the first year of your baby’s life, it will need to be fed frequently. It is important to your baby’s development to receive the nutrients they need from breast milk or formula. Newborns should be fed every 2-3 hours, and as they grow older, they will be able to go longer between feedings. By 6 months old, feeding your baby every 4-5 hours should be sufficient.

There are a few things to keep in mind when you are feeding your baby. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, “Babies should be fed solid food when they are developmentally ready for it, which is usually around 6 months old. Starting solids too early or waiting too long can make it hard for your baby to learn how to eat well and can cause problems with their health.”

It is important to start with small amounts of food and gradually increase the amount as your baby gets used to eating solid food. You should also avoid giving your baby food that could choke them, such as nuts, popcorn, or hard candies.

When you are introducing new foods to your baby, it is important to watch for signs of allergies. Some common allergies include dairy, soy, wheat, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish. If your baby has a reaction to a food, such as vomiting, diarrhea, hives, or difficulty breathing, you should stop feeding them that food and consult with your pediatrician.

The following is a general guide for what and how much to feed your baby.

Feeding schedule from birth to 2 month old

One of the important decisions you will make as a new parent is how and what to feed your baby. For the newborn breast milk is the best option but if you are unable to breastfeed then you can opt for infant formula. If you have chosen to feed your baby with infant formula, make sure to ask the pediatrician about which brand to buy. Below we have mentioned the table how when or how much quantity you should give to your baby and this is:

Age Time What To Feed? How Much Feed? How Often?
0-1 Month In Every 2-3 Hours Only Breast-Milk 2-3 Ounces, Every 3-4 Hours. 8-12 Feeding Per Day (Continue To Feed Your Baby On Demand, Whether It’s Breast Milk Or Formula.)
1-2 Months Nurse In Every 2-3 Hours Only Breast-Milk (4 Ounces Maximum) 8-12 Feedings/Day
In Every 2-3 Hours Formula Milk 3-4 Ounces Bottles. 6-8 Feedings/Day (As Per Baby Need)
Feeding schedule from 2 to 4 months old

During the first three months, babies should be fed every 3-to 4 hours. At 4 months old stage, you can start giving your baby solid foods in addition to breast milk or formula. But before that part keep in mind that every baby is different and when your baby starts to hold their head up, begins to sit with support, or starts to show interest in food then you can give them solid foods. The below table will tell you the how much amount of milk or formula you should give to your baby:

Age Time What To Feed? How Much Feed? How Often?
2-3 Months In Every 3-4 Hours Breast-Milk Formula 4-5 Ounces 6-7 Feedings (As Per Need Of The Day)
In Every 3-4 Hours Formula-Milk 3-4 Ounces 5-6 Feedings (As Per Need Of The Baby)
3-4 Months In Every 3-4 Hours Breast-Milk 5-6 Ounces. 5-6 Feedings
In Every 3-4 Hours
Formula-Milk 4-5 Ounces Bottles. 5-6 Feedings Per Day
Feeding schedule from 4 to 6 months old

For a 4 to 6 months old baby, a variety of food will be gradually increased as your baby starts to eat more solid foods and breastfeed or formula less. Look at the below table to know how many tablespoons you need to give per day:

Time What To Feed? How Much Feed?
7.00 A.M (Wake-Up Time) Nurse Or Bottle. 6 To 8 Ounces Breast Milk Or Formula Milk
7.45 A.M (Breakfast) Cereal

Mashed Bananas Or Sweet-Potatoes (On Your Choice) (Any One)

1 To 4 Tablespoons Infant Cereal,

1 To 4 Tablespoons Mashed Banana Or Sweet Potatoes

8.45 A.M. To 10.45 A.M. Nap Time ——————
12.00 P.M. Again, Nurse Or Bottle 6 To 8 Ounces Breast Milk Or Formula Milk
12.30 P.M. Snack Meal (Pureed Vegetables Or Fruit As Per Choice) (1-4 Table Spoon Or Have Some Other Activities Like Playing Gestures With Your Baby)
2.30 P.M. Nurse Or Bottle 2-4 Ounces Breast Milk Or Formula Milk
2.30 P.M-5.00 P.M. Afternoon Nap Time ——————
5.45 P.M. (Dinner Time)

Mashed Potatoes Or Banana (Any One)

Pureed Peas Or Another Vegetable

1 To 4 Tablespoons Mashed Sweet Potato Or Banana

1 To 4 Tablespoons

6.45 P.M. Nurse Or Bottle 6 To 8 Ounces Breast Milk Or Formula Milk
7.00 P.M. Bed Nap Time ——-
Feeding schedule from 6 to 12 months old

If your child is between 6-12 months old, they can have 3 small meals with a maximum of 1 snack in a day. Try to give them healthy and nutritious food. In below table we have mentioned some options that you can give to your baby at this stage with appropriate amount:

Time What To Feed? How Much Feed?
7.00 A.M (Wake-Up Time) Nurse Or Bottle. 6 To 8 Ounces Breast Milk Or Formula Milk
7.45 A.M (Breakfast)

Greek Yogurt

Sliced Strawberries

Whole Grain Toast

(10-12 Months Old):

Oats

Peanut Butter

Smashed Blueberries And Other Fruits (As Per Choice)

2 To 3 Tablespoons

2 To 3 Tablespoons

1/4 Slice

1/4 Cup

1 To 2 Teaspoons

2 To 3 Tablespoons

9.30 A.M. To 11.30 A.M. Nap Time ——————
11.30 A.M. Again, Nurse Or Bottle 6 To 8 Ounces Breast Milk Or Formula Milk
12.00 P.M. (Lunch Time)

Hard-Boiled Eggs

Mashed Avocado

Whole Grain Pita

When (10-12 Months):

Black Bean And Cheese Quesadilla On Whole Grain Tortilla

Steamed Carrot Half-Moons

1/4 To 1/2 Sliced

2 To 3 Tablespoons

1/4 To 1/2

1/4 To 1/2 Sliced Into Small Pieces,

2 To 3 Tablespoons

2.00 P.M-4.00 P.M. Afternoon Nap Time ——————
4.00 P.M. Nurse Or Bottle 6 To 8 Ounces Breast Milk Or Formula Milk
5.30 P.M. (Dinner Time)

Mini Meatballs Of Turkey

Cooked Whole Grain Pasta

Steamed Broccoli Florets

10-12 Months:

Flaked Salmon

Sweet Potato Wedges

Steamed Green Beans With Butter

2 To 3 Tablespoons

2 To 3 Tablespoons

1 To 2 Tablespoons

3 To 4 Tablespoons

3 To 4 Tablespoons

3 To 4 Tablespoons

7.00 P.M. Nurse Or Bottle 6 To 8 Ounces Breast Milk Or Formula Milk
7.30 P.M. Bed Nap Time ——-

What’s The Food Chart For A First-Year Baby?

Age Ounces Per Feeding Solid Foods How Much Per Day?
Up To 2 Weeks 5 Oz In The First Day Or Weeks

After Then 1-3 Oz.

No Solid Food Allowed!! 8-12 Feedings (As Per Your Baby Needs)
2 Weeks To 2 Months Maximum 2-4 Oz. No Solid Food Allowed!! 8-12 Feedings (As Per Your Baby Needs)
2-Months To 4 Months Maximum 4-6 Oz. No Solid Food Allowed!! 8-12 Feedings (As Per Your Baby Needs)
4 Months To 6 Months Maximum 4-8 Oz. · Pureed Vegetables,

· Pureed Fruits,

· Pureed Meat,

· Semi-Liquid, Iron-Fortified Cereal

· Small Amounts Of Unsweetened Yogurt

Note: No Cow’s Milk Until Age 1

6-8 Feedings Per Day

(1-2 Tablespoons)

6 Months To 8 Months Maximum 8 Oz. · Pureed Or Strained Fruits

· Pureed Or Strained Veggies

· Pureed Or Mashed Meat

· Small Amounts Cheese, Or Unsweetened Yogurt

· Pureed Or Mashed Legumes

· Iron-Fortified Cereal

6-7 Feedings Per Day

· 2 To 3 Tablespoons Fruit And Vegetables (Can Give 4 To 8 Tablespoons)

· 1 To 2 Tablespoons Grain Products

· 1 To 2 Tablespoons Protein-Rich Foods

9 Months To 12 Months Maximum 8 Oz. · Cottage Cheese, And Unsweetened Yogurt

· Bite-Size, Soft-Cooked Vegetables

· Fruit Mashed Or Cut Into Soft Cubes Or Strips

· Finger Foods

· Protein-Rich Foods

· Iron-Fortified Cereal And Other Grains

5-7 Feedings Per Day

· 1/2 To 3/4 Cup Fruit

· 1/2 To 3/4 Cup Vegetables

· 1/4 To 1/2 Cup Grain Products

· 1/4 To 1/2 Cup Protein-Rich Foods

What’s the food chart for a first-year baby?

In the first year, babies need appropriate nutrition to develop and grow properly. To ensure that your baby is getting the nutrition he or she needs, it is important to follow a food chart. A first-year baby’s diet should include breast milk or formula, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and protein. The chart below provides a general overview of the types of food that a baby should eat and the recommended servings for each food group. It’s important to note that these are just general guidelines and that your baby’s diet may vary depending on his or her age and stage of development. Look at the below chart:

What type of solid food you should give your child?

Solid food is an important part of your baby’s diet when they start to hold their head up, sit with support and show interest in what you are eating. It helps them get the nutrients they need to grow and develop properly. The type of solid food you give your child will depend on their age and development stage. Below we have mentioned foods that you can introduce to your child according to their age group.

From 4 months to 6 months of age

Peas: Peas are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, iron, and folic acid. They are a portion of good first food for your baby.

Squash: Squash is an excellent source of vitamins A and C. It also contains potassium and fiber.

Apples: Apples is the perfect baby food that is easy to digest and is a good source of dietary fiber and vitamins A and C.

Bananas: Bananas are a great source of dietary potassium, vitamin C, dietary fiber, and vitamin B6. They also contain small amounts of iron, magnesium, and calcium.

Oats: Oats are rich in fiber and protein. They also contain thiamine, iron, and magnesium.

From 6 months to 8 months of age

Avocado: Avocados are a good source of healthy fats and vitamins. You can give your baby avocado in puree or mashed form.

Sweet potato: Sweet potatoes are a good source of fiber, and vitamins A, C, and B6. You can give your baby mashed or pureed sweet potatoes.

Carrot: Carrot would be a good food to introduce to your baby during the first year. Carrot is not only healthy but also easy to digest. You can start feeding your baby carrots from around 6 months old.

Mashed fish: Fish is a good source of protein, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamins A and D. You can give your baby mashed or pureed fish.

Cheese: At this stage, you can introduce cottage cheese, feta cheese, or cream cheese to your baby. As cheese has a high sodium content, give it to your baby in moderation.

Yogurt: Yogurt is an excellent first food for babies. It’s packed with nutrients, protein, and calcium. You can offer yogurt as finger food or mix it with other foods such as fruits or cereals.

From 8 months to 12 months of age

Soft pasteurized cheese: You can give your baby small pieces of soft pasteurized cheese to chew on. As your baby starts to teeth, it will need softer foods that are easy to gum and chew.

Cube-cut fruits: Fruits such as apples, bananas, and mangoes can be cut into small cubes for your baby to eat. Your baby may also be able to handle small pieces of soft fruits such as watermelon, cantaloupe, and honeydew.

Meat: You can give your baby small pieces of cooked chicken, turkey, or beef. You can either mash them or cut them into small strips.

Finger foods: You can give your baby finger foods such as cooked pasta, small pieces of crackers, or bread.

Cooked vegetables: Now at this stage, your baby can eat a variety of cooked vegetables like carrots, sweet potatoes, squash, broccoli, etc. You can either mash them or give them in small pieces. Just make sure they are soft enough for your baby to gum and chew easily.

Whole grain: You can start giving your baby whole grains like quinoa, oats, barley, etc. in the form of cereal or as porridge. You can either cook them with water or milk. Start with a thin consistency and then gradually make it thick.

How long does it take to breastfeed babies?

On average, newborns may nurse for up to 20 minutes or longer on one or both breasts. Nursing should be a relaxed and enjoyable experience for both mother and baby. As the baby nurses, he will suckle and then release the nipple, usually swallowing milk ejected from the breast. After a few minutes of rest, he will start to suckle again. This cycle will continue until the baby is satisfied. The frequency of nursing will depend on how much milk the baby consumes and how often he or she needs to eat.

When should babies have 2 meals a day?

Around six months of age, babies typically start to eat solid foods. Two meals a day is generally recommended at this point. Breakfast and dinner are the most common choices for a baby’s first two meals, but you can also give your baby two snacks instead of one meal if that works better for your family’s schedule.

It’s important to introduce new foods slowly and gradually so that your baby has time to get used to them and so that you can watch for any allergic reactions. Some parents choose to wean their babies onto solids by giving them breast milk or formula as their first “meal”, and then gradually adding in solid foods over time. Others just start with solids altogether. As always, consult with your pediatrician about what’s best for your baby and your family.

Do babies drink less milk after starting solids?

There is no definitive answer to this question as every baby is different. Some babies may drink less milk after starting solids, while others may not be affected at all. It really depends on the individual baby and how much they enjoy solid foods. Some babies may prefer the taste of solid foods and start to eat less milk as a result, while others may continue to drink milk as their main source of nutrition. solids simply act as a supplement for them. There is no right or wrong answer, it really varies from baby to baby. If you are concerned about your baby’s intake of milk or nutrients, speak to your pediatrician for guidance.

When should I introduce water to my baby?

Pediatricians generally recommend waiting until a baby is about six months old to start giving them water.8

Some babies may be ready for water as early as four or five months old, but it’s best to check with your pediatrician to see what they recommend. Babies under six months old are still getting most of their hydration from breastmilk or formula, so they don’t need extra water until they’re older.

Water can be introduced in a number of different ways – through a sippy cup, a bottle, or even just mixed in with the food that they’re eating. It’s important to make sure that your baby isn’t drinking too much water, though, since it can replace the milk or formula that they need for proper nutrition.

The Conclusion

As well the first year of your baby is very important, so you need to be very careful about what you feed your baby and how often. Your baby is growing and changing every day, so it’s important to give them the right nutrients at the right time. The best way to ensure that your baby is getting all the nutrients they need is to breastfeed. Breast milk is packed with nutrients and antibodies that help protect your baby from illness.

If you are not able to breastfeed, or if you are supplementing with formula, there are still things you can do to make sure your baby is getting all the nutrients they need. For the first few months of your baby’s life, they will primarily be drinking breast milk or formula. Around 4 or 6 months, you can start to introduce solid foods as per your baby’s feeding schedule. We hope you found it helpful and that you feel more confident about what, when, and how much to feed your little one. Remember, every baby is different so don’t be afraid to experiment a bit to find out what works best for your family. And if you have any questions or concerns along the way, please don’t hesitate to reach out for advice – we are always here to help. Thanks for reading!

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